How to say “Cheers” in Irish

Exclaim “Sláinte!" This is the closest term you can use to toast someone "cheers!" in Irish Gaelic.

  • More accurately, the term “sláinte” translates into the English term “health.” When using this term, you are essentially toasting to someone’s health.
  • Pronounce this Irish term as slawn-cha.

Offer “Sláinte mhaith!" This phrase emphasizes the well wishes of a standard "cheers."

  • "Sláinte" means "health" and "mhaith" means "good."
  • Translated directly, the term means “health good” or “good health.”
  • You should pronounce this Irish phrase as slawn-cha wy(h).

State “Sláinte chugat!" This variation on the traditional "cheers" is a bit more personal and individualized.

  • "Sláinte" means "health" and "chugat" means "you."
  • When paired together in this manner, the English translation is “health to you.”
  • Pronounce the Irish toast as slawn-cha hoo-geht.

Six retired Irishmen were playing poker in O’Leary’s apartment when Paddy Murphy loses $500 on a single hand, clutches his chest and drops dead at the table. Showing respect for their fallen brother, the other five continue playing standing up.
Michael O’Connor looks around and asks, “Oh, me boys, someone got’s to tell Paddy’s wife… who will it be?” 
They draw straws. Paul Gallagher picks the short one. They tell him to be discreet, be gentle, don’t make a bad situation any worse.
"Discreet? I’m the most discreet Irishmen you’ll ever meet. Discretion is me middle name. Leave it to me."
Gallagher goes over to Murphy’s house and knocks on the door. Mrs. Murphy answers and asks what he wants. Gallagher declares, “Your husband just lost $500 and is afraid to come home.” 
"Tell him to drop dead!", says Murphy’s wife.
"I’ll go tell him," says Gallagher.

An old Irishman was asked, “At your ripe age, what would you prefer to get… Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s?”

The Irishman answered, “Definitely Parkinson’s…

Better to spill half an ounce of whiskey than to forget where you keep the bottle!”

Two Irishmen were adrift in a life boat following a dramatic escape from a burning freighter. While rummaging through the boat’s provisions, one of the men stumbled across an old lamp. Secretly hoping that a genie would appear, he rubbed the lamp vigorously. To the amazement of the castaways, a genie came forth. This particular genie, however, stated that he could only deliver one wish, not the standard three. Without giving much thought to the matter the man blurted out,

"Make the entire ocean into beer!"


The genie clapped his hands with a deafening crash, and immediately the entire sea turned into the finest brew ever sampled by mortals. Simultaneously, the genie vanished. Only the gentle lapping of beer on the hull broke the stillness as the men considered their circumstances. One man looked disgustedly at the other whose wish had been granted. After a long, tension filled moment, he spoke:

"Nice going idiot! Now we’re going to have to piss in the boat."

In Irish folklore, the Bean Sidhe (woman of the hills) is a spirit or fairy who presage a death by wailing. She is popularly known as the Banshee. She visits a household and by wailing she warns them that a member of their family is about to die. When a Banshee is caught, she is obliged to tell the name of the doomed.The antiquity of this concept is vouched for by the fact that the Morrigan, in a poem from the 8th century, is described as washing spoils and entrails. It was believed in County Clare that Richard the Clare, the Norman leader of the 12th century, had met a horrible beldame, washing armor and rich robes “until the red gore churned in her hands”, who warned him of the destruction of his host.The Bean Sidhe has long streaming hair and is dressed in a gray cloak over a green dress. Her eyes are fiery red from the constant weeping. When multiple Banshees wail together, it will herald the death of someone very great or holy. Aiobhill is the banshee of the Dalcassians of North Munster, and Cliodna is the banshee of the MacCarthys and other families of South Munster.

In Irish folklore, the Bean Sidhe (woman of the hills) is a spirit or fairy who presage a death by wailing. She is popularly known as the Banshee. She visits a household and by wailing she warns them that a member of their family is about to die. When a Banshee is caught, she is obliged to tell the name of the doomed.

The antiquity of this concept is vouched for by the fact that the Morrigan, in a poem from the 8th century, is described as washing spoils and entrails. It was believed in County Clare that Richard the Clare, the Norman leader of the 12th century, had met a horrible beldame, washing armor and rich robes “until the red gore churned in her hands”, who warned him of the destruction of his host.

The Bean Sidhe has long streaming hair and is dressed in a gray cloak over a green dress. Her eyes are fiery red from the constant weeping. When multiple Banshees wail together, it will herald the death of someone very great or holy.

Aiobhill is the banshee of the Dalcassians of North Munster, and Cliodna is the banshee of the MacCarthys and other families of South Munster.